Articles in the Campaign Optimization Category

Learn how to optimize your PPC, display, social media and remarketing efforts with help from our SEM team. From big-picture strategy ideas to the granular tweaks that will help you to improve your campaigns’ performance, our campaign optimization blog posts will provide you with the information you need to improve your ROI and drive qualified, converting traffic to your website.

January 3 2012

Define a View-through Conversion


Google says a View-through conversion happens when a customer sees an image or rich media ad on the Google Display Network, then later returns to your site through a bookmark an organic listing or direct URL and completes a conversion on your site. A View-through conversion is different from a click-through conversion in that a click-through conversion happens when a visitor previously clicked on an ad and then completed a conversion on your site.

In addition, because a visitor did not click on the ad but then later went to your site and converted, if you are using a cost-per-click (CPC) model for your AdWords campaign, theoretically, it did not cost you anything to receive this conversion.

View-through conversions will only occur for campaigns opted into the Google Display Network and using image ads.  That being said, campaigns utilizing Remarketing are more likely to receive View-through conversions, because the visitor is already acquainted with your site and when he/she sees an image ad reminding him/her of your site’s products or services, the visitor is more likely to return to your site and convert.

Please note that conversion tracking must be in place in your AdWords account to see both View-through and click-through conversions and View-through conversions must be enabled. To enable View-through conversions, go to the “Advanced tab” underneath the “Tools and Analysis”. See screen shot below:


For more information on View-through conversions, click here.

March 15 2011

High Traffic Numbers, Low Conversions?


With the recent update to Google’s algorithm, designed to improve their search results and punish content farms, SEO has been a hot topic.  I get many industry newsletters each week and the majority are discussing topics related to Social Media, but SEO has seen a nice bump in awareness given Google’s recent update in late February.  However, companies who focus too much on how their website performs in the Google index can miss the most important aspect of their internet presence.  How well does the website perform when someone actually visits the site?  Regardless of the source of traffic (organic, paid, referral, or direct) your site’s ability to convert visitors into customers relies more on usability than your rankings in the search engine results pages (SERPs).

Think about your site’s performance in terms of visitor engagement.  Do many visitors leave after viewing only one page (in other words, do you have a high bounce rate)?  Is there a statistically significant percentage of visitors who view many pages per visit but never complete the desired call to action on your site?  Testing different colors, images and page layouts can help determine the best website design to convert your visitors to customers.  While it way seem elementary to test a blue background versus a white one, you may be surprised to see how even subtle changes can increase your site’s performance.

An excellent way to leverage your visitor’s interaction and help increase the performance of your site is through usability experiments.  Google Website Optimizer (GWO) is an easy to set up (and free) tool that allows you to test different page layouts, images, and color schemes to determine which best leads to a desired result.  Moving an image from the right hand side of the page to the left may be just the change needed to increase conversions.  Using bullet points instead of paragraph text may help lower a page’s bounce rate.  There could be hundreds of different combinations in which to layout your pages and test which performs best.  Think about your site’s usability and the user experience while you are reviewing your next traffic report.  The changes you make to increase your site’s performance should be born from usability experiments rather than how well your site ranks in the SERPs or the volume of traffic your site receives.

September 27 2010

More Opportunities for Testing


Those of you who are familiar with Google Website Optimizer (GWO) know the importance of testing your online marketing efforts.  Testing really is the best way to know whether or not proposed changes to your website are going to have a positive or negative impact on your bottom line.  If you haven’t tried a GWO experiment, I would highly recommend it.  For more info on conducting an experiment, you should read the blog post 6 Critical Steps for Starting you Google Website Optimizer Experiments.

The world of website testing is continuing to develop, which is great.  All online marketers should be testing their online marketing initiatives, whether it is elements on their website or keywords within their campaigns. Google AdWords has followed Google Website Optimizer’s lead and is now offering another way to conduct tests; this time with your AdWords campaigns. This new program, called AdWords Campaign Experiments (ACE), will enable you to test changes to your bids, keywords, and ad groups before applying those changes to all auctions for which your ad could appear. 

For example, if you want to measure the impact of increasing a keyword’s bid, you can easily accomplish that without having to test all auctions.  With ACE, you have the ability to select the control / experiment split for your changes. You can choose 50% control / 50% experiment, 60% control / 40% experiment, and so on.  Similar to GWO experiments, ACE runs the experiment or test seamlessly with the existing campaign set up.

This tool can be found within the settings tab for your campaigns, and since you can set the experiment splits and the start and stop dates, you lower the risk of testing new ideas.  If you want to test increasing a keyword’s bid without ACE, the new bid would be applied to all auctions.  The problem is that even if the results were good, it is difficult to be 100% positive that the results were not due to other contributing factors.

So, next time you are thinking about making changes to your campaigns and would like to test the results first, look into using ACE.  It may help you to determine whether or not this change would be beneficial.

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