Articles written in January, 2013

January 28 2013

How to Use Google’s Data Highlighter | The Basics


Last week, we brought you an introduction to Google’s Data Highlighter Tool. This week, we will be covering some basic steps on how to use it. First, we’ll go over a quick recap on what needs to be done. Before using the data highlighter, you must have:

  • Google’s Webmaster Tools verified for your domain.
  • Structured event data, such as an event with a date and time.
  • Checked to ensure the pages have recently been crawled by Googlebot.

The next step is to ensure that the pages you will use the tool on are pages that consistently display structured event data. These pages must also use URLs that follow a simple and consistent pattern. This is called a page set. Currently, the data highlighter can only be used on pages that are in a page set. It allows Google to make sense of the structured data on your site by following this common pattern. Google gives the following URLs as an example page set:


These two URLs are a great example of a page set, because they provide a simple structure and easy to follow pattern. It is clear that they both contain information on music events along with specific genre of music.

After these requirements have been met, it’s time to use the data highlighter. In order to use the tool:

1.   Log in to your webmaster tools account.
2.   Click the “Optimization” menu on the left side navigation.
3.   Select “Data Highlighter.”

Now you will see a video about the tool as well as some more information about tagging pages. You will also notice a blue button that reads “Start Highlighting.” The final steps are:

4.   Click the button that reads “Start Highlighting.”
5.   A box will pop up allowing you to tag either:

  • a. Tag this page and others like it
  • b. Tag just this page

If you will be marking up one page, select “Tag just this page.” If you will be marking up a page set, select “Tag this page and others like it.”

6.   Enter the URL of the first page in the page set, or the single page’s URL.
7.   Select “OK.”

Now the page of the URL that you input will appear on the screen.

8.   Highlight one type of structured data at a time (name, date, location, etc.) using your mouse, just as if you were highlighting something in Microsoft Word.
9.   Right click the highlighted information and select the type of data that is highlighted (name, date, location, etc.).
10.   Highlight all of the pertinent data on the page and watch it appear in the right hand column.
11. Once done, click the red “Next” button on the top right of the screen.
12.   View your final information and if correct, click the red “Publish” button on the top right of the screen.

This is all it takes to show Google the structured data that is contained on pages of your website. According to Google, it takes between 5 and 10 manually tagged pages with the data highlighter for their algorithms to understand the patterns on your website. It also may take some time for these results to appear in Google’s search engine results pages. If you have used the tool properly, and considerable time has passed with no results, your website may be facing other SEO issues that need to be addressed first. Will the data highlighter make structured data markup easier for you?

January 16 2013

Get Your Mobile House in Order in 2013


The research firm emarketer released so-called M-Commerce numbers for 2012 last week, and the numbers were staggering. Emarketer estimates that mobile shopping jumped 81% overall last year to nearly $25 billion, capturing 15% of all online sales.

And that’s just the beginning. Emarketer estimates that sales from tablets and mobile phones combined will jump to more than 37 billion this year.

This isn’t surprising when you consider that mobile customers are everywhere. When they’re not “second-screening,” they’re shopping for shoes while pumping gas, looking for a broker while enjoying a latte, or sending flowers while waiting in line at the bank.

In order to take advantage of these trends, you not only need a mobile website, you have to make sure that people can find it.

That’s why it’s time to get your mobile house in order.

If you don’t have a mobile website, get one. If have one, make sure it’s search engine optimized, while ensuring your mobile content is user-friendly.

From there, make sure potential customers can find you by encouraging social and review site users to check in, running ads that target mobile devices, and sending them to simple, user-friendly landing pages with click-to-buy-capability where applicable.

Do these things and you stand the chance of having a very, very good year.

January 15 2013

Introduction to Google’s Data Highlighter Tool


In the past we have covered the value of utilizing rich snippets which present search engine users with more detailed information about what is contained on the page before they click through to it. If you are unfamiliar with what rich snippets are, or the possible benefits from using them, take a look at two of our blog posts that cover the subject:

Now that you are familiar with rich snippets, it’s important to keep up to date with resources and tools that can make you or your web team more efficient. It is in this interest that Google has released the Data Highlighter Tool. This tool allows you to tag the data fields on your website using a mouse and does not require any coding. Currently, only event data is able to be marked up using the Data Highlighter, but Google says that more data types will be supported soon!

Event data that can be marked up includes:

  • Name — The event name.
  • Date — The date, date and time, or date range of the event.
  • Location — The venue name and address of the event.
  • Image — An image describing the event.
  • Official URL — The URL to the official website of the event.
  • Category — The category of the event.
  • Performer — A performer in the event.
  • Ticket offer — A description of the price information and the price of admission.

Additionally, it is important to note that the data highlighter can only be used on pages that have been recently crawled by their spider Googlebot. One easy way to see if the page has been crawled is to check to see if Google has a recent cached version of the page. This can be accomplished by:

  • Copying the specific URL of the page you want to check
  • Typing cache: and then pasting the URL after the colon

For example –

If Google has a recently crawled and cached version of the page, the page will load with a box near the top that looks similar to the following screen grab:

This tool will be expanded by Google in the near future to support more types of structured data, but if you are more eager to learn about it now, visit the Google’s Data Highlighter page here:  

Do you see this as being an easier or more efficient way to mark up the structured data of your website? A more detailed post on how to use Google’s Data Highlighter will follow this one, so check back with our SEO blog to learn more.

© 2016 MoreVisibility. All rights reserved