Articles in the Digital Marketing 101 – The Basics Category

Once you get the hang of it, digital marketing can seem like old hat. Before then, it’s important to learn the basics. In our Digital Marketing 101 blog posts, we offer an education into the ins and outs of the digital marketing landscape. Read these blog posts to learn digital marketing basics, such as creating campaigns, writing effective ad copy, and more.

February 6 2007

CPC Engines – What Else Besides Google?

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Everyone knows Google, and as a result new online advertisers are relatively comfortable to dabble with its Adwords program and its seemingly simple interface. They usually will also experiment with Yahoo and even the new MSN AdCenter. More sophisticated Internet advertisers, familiar with cpc marketing, may also venture into Shopping Feeds or Comparison Engines and/or Travel Portals, if sites are within those verticals. But what else is out there?

An option to consider is some of the lesser known or newer entrants into the cost per click market, including contextual platforms. Based on your industry or vertical, some may be more applicable than others. These can potentially deliver some very qualified and targeted traffic at a reasonable cost. Again, any new marketing venture should be carefully analyzed for performance and ROI data prior to making a long term implementation strategy or large financial investment.

Here are some Ad Networks/Engines to consider:

ASK– listings override those supplied by Google AdWords. Pricing is determined by Engine and is typically market priced to Google. There are only 3 advertisers accepted per Keyword — Engine gaining marketshare; it’s about 6% currently.

SuperPages (previously Verizon) — this popular offline brand provides online premium ads via Yellow Page listings (local or national) through Keyword / Category cpc advertising. They also offer a Pay Per Call program — great for those advertisers preferring a phone call from web traffic over a click to their website.

Quigo — Adsonar program allows content-targeted advertising through a cpc model. Option of ads to be displayed on specific pages selected, in relevant sections of sites requested, within targeted RSS Feeds or email newsletters.

Amazon/ClickRiver — Sponsored ads on Amazon.com search results and product details pages via cpc, which compliment the shopper’s experience. Not all advertisers accepted, based on competitiveness to company (Amazon) itself. Program still in Beta but is performing well so far

Industry Brains – Contextually based cpc and cpm advertising — ability to target specific sites/portals that match your demographic or are complimentary to your target market.
Banners and text ads offered — targeting by industry offered.

AdKnowledge – contextually driven cpc advertising, based upon category and sub categories self-selected. Text ads can appear in header/footer of network emails.
StumbledUpon & Performancing — Very new opportunities; these are geared toward advertising within Blogs or social media platforms, via CPC or CPM contextual ads

January 24 2007

Video Game Ads

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Google announced this week it’s plan to to stretch it’s muscular arm into a new advertising medium. According to a Wall Street Journal article, Google is in talks with AdScape Media, whose specialty is advertising in video games for consoles like Nintendo, Xbox or PlayStation. According to a PaidContent.org article, most new gaming systems offer the option of online game play, which makes this type of advertising possible. Google said “We are always considering new ways to extend Google’s advertising program to benefit our users, advertisers and publishers. In-game advertising offers one such possible extension among many others.” I think that this type of advertising will allow for an interesting edge in putting very targeted advertising in front of a virtually untapped audience, but I’m curious of how success will be tracked. Will this be a CPM project for branding or will players be expected to pause game play to visit a sponsor’s site? I will be very interested to see how this idea unfolds into statistics and conversion rates.

Please check back often for the latest information as it becomes available either at our blog or www.MoreVisibility.com.

January 3 2007

Packaging Turns to Gold Online

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Search Engine Marketing is the Next Frontier for Consumer Package Goods Companies

A recent eMarketer article highlights the emergence of an under-recognized trend in search engine query behavior. Consumers are increasingly using search engines to find and purchase consumer package goods. No trip to the store required, search engines are becoming the most-frequented direct-line to consumer package goods for many Americans. Sixty-seven percent of the participants in the cited survey reported search engines as their number one means of finding consumer package goods online (eMarketer, December 29, 2006). And these survey results don’t just include people who are searching for clothing and other products that are more typically associated with online research and shopping. Instead, the survey results show that food, personal care items, and cleaning products, are high on consumers’ lists of products they find via search engines.

So what does this mean for consumer package goods companies and their advertising dollars? Search Engine Marketing is the key to reaching your customers online. Consumer package goods companies need to start invigorating their advertising strategies and budgets with more search engine marketing. And as these search behaviors increase over time, advertising online via search engine marketing will increase consumer package goods companies’ visibility and ensure they are reaching these consumers right from the start.

As of yet, this trend in consumer behavior isn’t being sufficiently recognized by the consumer package goods industry. While many industry leaders as diverse as Colgate and Gap Corporation are utilizing search engine marketing as a means to drive sales, most others aren’t reacting as quickly. It is estimated that only 1% of the overall 2006 advertising spend of U.S. consumer package goods companies was devoted to search engine marketing (eMarketer, December 29, 2006). For an industry so large and far-reaching, this lack of emphasis on search engine marketing as a heavily used advertising strategy is a hindrance to growth — the consumer package goods industry would be best advised to stay ahead of the consumer-behavior trend and engage in search engine marketing as a way to capture its evolving customer base.

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